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UK Style news and blog articles from The Huffington Post
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    The Nicopanda beauty look at London Fashion Week involved a strong 80s influence and smudged red, bold silver and blue lips.


    Watch the video above to get an exclusive peek backstage at the vast team of stylists at work wielding Dyson hairdryers and makeup brushes to get the models runway ready.


    Or scroll down to see some of our favourite looks from the show on Saturday 16 September.






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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Temperley London’s SS18 show at London Fashion Week was everything we expected and more.  


    The collection read like a colourful summer spent somewhere far, far away from the blustering UK. The beauty look, in particular, made us long for a spot on that trip. 




    From the bold lip, to the highlight on the cheekbones and the head ties some of the models were donning, the detailing was truly lust-worthy. 





    As for the SS18 collection itself, print ruled the roost, but silks and diamanté had their moments. 


    Frills and plunging necklines in delicate hues were also in abundance. 




    Temperley’s spring/summer take is suitably accessible, while simultaneously flirting with luxury



    You can tell a lot about a show - a brand, even - by its front row. But when all the rows read like a who’s who of British fashion, film and media, you know that brand’s legit.

    Notable faces on Temperley’s FROW included Olga Kurylenko, Claudia Winkleman, Pixie Lott, Amber Le Bon, Jasmine Guinness and renowned photographer Greg Williams.





    It was also fun to spot Charlotte Tilbury rushing off backstage, her dedicated squad right behind her as they hauled bags of makeup. 



    After the show, friends of the brand snuck backstage to say hello. 




    Also in attendance were sets of industry-families along with their well-dressed heirs - which meant their were too many cute kids in couture in one room.


    We’re willing to bet Temperley London’s SS18 collection would make great vintage items by the time they’re old enough to sport them. 


    Can you say ‘fabulous?’


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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Jourdan Dunn’s appearance on the Topshop catwalk at London Fashion Week was nothing short of a vision.


    Dressed in a flowing chiffon nearly-naked gown Dunn had clearly left the drama of last night behind her as she took to the runway on Sunday 17 September.


    And the best part? You don’t have to wait until next year to shop the collection, pieces are available online now and prices start from just £39 for a pink bralet.





    Adwoa Aboah and Hailey Baldwin were also on the catwalk.



    Baldwin modelled a pink mohair peacoat, which is available to buy now for £165.



    Vogue editor-in-chief was joined on the FROW by Kate Moss and her daughter Lila Grace Moss Hack.



    Kate Moss’ little sister, fellow model Lottie Moss was also in attendance.



    Other celebs on the FROW included:


    Singers Ella Eyre and Charli XCX.



    Model Selah Marley, and singers Ray BLK and Mabel McVey.



    Actors Zawe Ashton and Vicky McClure.



    Actor Georgina Campbell.



    And singer-songwrite Jessie Ware.



    Click through the gallery below to discover other Topshop catwalk looks that are available to shop now (they’re selling out fast but Topshop have promised a restock of selected items by the end of next week):



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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Barely minutes after the Holly Fulton presentation ends and social media erupts with shares from the evening. 


    The SS18 collection shown at London Fashion Week on Sunday 17 September, boasted heavy monochrome prints with pops of colour injected in between the spaces within each ensemble. 



    A post shared by Carmen Hannemann (@missctotheh) on




    Zebra stripes permeated the collection, along with black and white checkerboard and floral prints. 



    A post shared by Sassoon Salon (@sassoonsalonuk) on




    The models lounged at their leisure as we gawked the addictively monochromatic outfits and accessories



    A post shared by Mathew Dixon (@mrmathewdixon) on




    With a collection this attractive, it’s no wonder many were tagging @studio_fulton on social. 



    A post shared by Mathew Dixon (@mrmathewdixon) on





    A post shared by jonjojury (@jonjojury) on








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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Liam Payne made his first London Fashion Week appearance of the season at the first Emporio Armani show in the city for a decade.


    Dressed in a burgundy textured tux jacket Payne may have been expecting to see a host of classic Armani suiting, but he - along with the rest of us - was in for a colourful surprise.




    Think of Emporio Armani and you think of classic, unobtrusive, safe styles. However it seems London’s creative spirit has helped the 83-year-old design legend get in touch with his fun, playful, childish side.


    Models walked the runway on Sunday 17 September wearing bright graphic prints in relaxed styles that are a world away from staid suits.






     Perhaps we can expect to see Payne in something like this next summer.



    Although of course Armani did throw in one or two suits for good measure. 




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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Imagine a blanket that covers about a quarter of the UK - spanning about 60billion square meters. That's how much fabric is wasted by the fashion industry during the cutting and manufacturing process.

    Imagine the irony of a much-loved industry that's second only to oil as the world's most polluting line of business: that's the fashion industry too.

    But you already know this, right? It's not news.

    Ever since Holly McQuillan and Timo Rissanen raised the idea of "zero-waste fashion" in their 2015 book, there has been media and industry discussion of what should be done to make better use of materials and take a more sustainable approach to design and production.

    The phrase they coined may have been new, but the idea has a long history.

    2017-09-15-1505484348-7396371-IMG_5069.JPG

    Photo credit - Verity Burton, Norwich University of the Arts



    The Japanese kimono is just one example of how material can be cut with zero or minimal waste by using geometric shapes to interlock on the fabric like a puzzle.

    And this approach was referenced, for example, by COS in their 10th anniversary collection by designing pieces which patterns would fit together like a jigsaw puzzle and utilised the width of the fabric to minimise waste.

    So it can be done. We need to practice, not just preach.

    The moment that opened my eyes came during my Masters project at Norwich University of the Art on zero waste pattern cutting and circular design.

    It was not about just discussing and writing about the issues. I truly started to see the impact of my own actions and my own practice.

    The zero waste design process for me starts by sketching a rough initial design idea or deciding a garment type to create, and then developing it further through a zero waste pattern-cutting process.

    I create patterns for the main elements of the design, for example, a certain type of sleeve or collar. I then explore how to re-design remaining patterns to fit into the spaces between the main pieces.

    2017-09-15-1505484410-410378-IMG_5100.JPG
    Photo credit - Verity Burton, Norwich University of the Arts



    Through this process, details, the shape and silhouette of the design can be refined. Any leftover pieces are used as detailing in the designing process for example as collars, pockets or within the inner structure.

    Industry-norm patterns were the starting point in the design process. Inspiration came from simple geometric patterns and lay plans of historical patterns which are the root of zero waste garment construction.

    Tamsin Lejeune, CEO of Mysource.io and founder of the Ethical Fashion Forum, argued last year that the fashion industry's sustainability issue will be solved not by talking but by developing solutions.

    But it is not only through new business models and certifications that the industry will make progress.

    Don't get me wrong, these large scale initiatives are the core of changing how a business is run.

    Real change will come by inspiring designers, pattern-cutters, and anyone who is active in product development, to take an interest in sustainability and to innovate new ways of working.

    That will change how the industry works - not just how it thinks.

    Of course, zero waste pattern-cutting isn't a singular solution to all of the industry's inherent sustainability issues.

    Even if the textile waste is minimised during manufacturing, the end-of-use phase for most garments is landfill or waste incinerators. Only about 20% of clothing is reused or recycled.

    This is where the larger context of circular economy and design comes to play; where the whole life-cycle of the product is taken into consideration: from sourcing of materials to its end-of-use where it can be made into new material, re-sold or repaired.

    For that model to work, the end customer needs to be motivated to take part in the company's circular model.

    That's where there's more persuasion - more preaching - to be done.

    But for practitioners, we know what needs to be done. And we can make a start, one design and piece of fabric at a time.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    I've been shooting London Fashion Week for over a decade. I love it. The showmanship and the glamour make it one of the highlights of my year. It's always been so theatrical. Take Vivienne Westwood's most recent Men's London Fashion Week: it was all acrobats - even clowns - and energy.

    It's more visually stimulating than ever; and as Getty Images is the newly appointed Official Supplier of the British Fashion Council and London Fashion Week, our access is unparalleled. Our team will shoot over 45,000 images during the four-day event, to ensure every moment is captured; a few thousand of which will be mine.

    More recently, I've been focusing on capturing those secret, backstage moments that you don't usually get to see, as well as looking to capture an alternative view of the theatre of the catwalk.

    Behind the scenes of runway shows, it's extremely hectic. There's hairspray, music pumping from the catwalk, hairdryers blasting, stylists and make-up artists rushing around to get everything ready in time, models full of energy and excitement, and it's up to me to capture moments that give a glimpse of life behind the curtain.

    Here's a selection of images from the first two days of London Fashion Week, with an alternative view.

    2017-09-17-1505645277-3289112-hailey_baldwin_1.jpg


    I started this season's London Fashion Week on assignment for adidas covering the Hailey Baldwin Presents: Streets of EQT show at the Truman Brewery in Brick Lane, East London. I work directly with a lot of major brands at Getty Images and this particular assignment had a lot of creative elements to it, from backstage shoots, to the runway show and portraits of Hailey. I arrived early to scout the location and set up my lighting kit for this shot, luckily I had JC my Getty Images field editor with me to edit and handle the image processing as we shot. We had to get this image out urgently for early press, speed is of the essence and at Getty Images we can deliver images in less than a minute from capture to the client's screen. With the portraits shot and approved I moved on to covering the backstage, models in hair and make up and final looks, then shot the runway show, it was a very busy start to the day but made for great images.


    2017-09-17-1505645343-9014260-hailey_baldwin_2.jpg



    I cover a lot of fashion shows from backstage and as part of a long term project called Backstage Portraits I like to isolate the model in the wider space of the backstage area to give the context of this environment. I like to find an area that is very obviously backstage with crew equipment and then work with the model to create a portrait image that is very different from my usual backstage coverage. I lishoot these images wide on a 24mm lens and have the model fairly small in the frame; it can be a bit of a challenge to find the right spot and exclude the hectic nature that usually prevails! I hope to exhibit and publish this project as a book in the future. This is model Brian Whittaker at the Hailey Baldwin Presents: Streets of EQT show shot for adidas at the Truman Brewery in Brick Lane, East London.


    2017-09-17-1505645484-221376-ashley_williams_1.jpg


    This is an alternative view of a model walking the runway at the Ashley Williams show held at the Swiss Church near Covent Garden. This season Getty Images is the Official Supplier of the British Fashion Council and London Fashion Week, so as well as covering the runway from the photographers' riser (an area directly in front of the runway) to get each look, we need to shoot from other angles to capture the atmosphere and energy of the shows. I found a small area to the side of the runway from where I could shoot the models from a different angle. Ashley Williams featured striking hats. To create this image I shot on a slow shutter speed and panned my camera slightly as the model passed me.


    2017-09-17-1505645523-6068312-alice_archer_1.jpg


    I was immediately struck by the fantastic colours of the makeup at the Alice Archer show as I arrived backstage. I quickly grabbed a camera from my bag and asked this model to stand by a big window to get strong light onto her face and show off the vibrant makeup. I shot a few frames of just her bright pink lips, and then asked her to bring her hands up to her chin to show off her orange fingernails, to make the colours pop. I like to get in very close and crop down to just a few elements when I'm shooting makeup, abstracting the image.

    2017-09-17-1505645602-9292458-alice_archer_2.jpg


    As well as runway shows, some designers do presentations, which are normally in amazing locations around London. I love shooting these as quite often you can utilise the architecture of the building as backdrops when working backstage. The Alice Archer presentation was at the Mary Ward House, which had lovely exposed brickwork, I framed the model up in this brick archway to make a different looking composition.

    2017-09-17-1505645638-7502737-alice_archer_3.jpg


    I shot this model using a Lensbaby Composer Pro lens which allows you to tilt the lens in different directions to the axis of the focal plane, and produces a lovely dreamlike quality to the image. This perfectly suited the look of the beautiful clothes at the Alice Archer presentation. I like experimenting with different pieces of camera kit to get unique looking images.

    2017-09-17-1505645672-3799124-alice_archer_4.jpg


    This image was shot during the rehearsal at the Alice Archer presentation. I like shooting rehearsals because you can get an idea of what final looks and light will be like, and you can move around a lot more freely and shoot from different vantage points. I moved to the side of this group of models and was drawn to the composition they made.

    2017-09-17-1505645697-6049344-markus_lupfer_1.jpg


    One of the main things I shoot when backstage is first-looks. This is when the models are in the clothes and the hair and make up is pretty much finished. Shooting first-looks can often be pretty hectic; it's just before the show begins and there's a hive of activity with hair and make up artists, stylists and crew, as well as photographers quite often in a small space! It made for a refreshing change at the Markus Lupfer show that the models were in a great space. Some were sat down in chairs, and there was a top floor balcony, which made for a great vantage point to shoot from to create a different looking image.

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    The stars of the silver screen lit up the red carpet on Sunday at the Emmy Awards to celebrate another year in television greatness, and they did so in style.


    Tracee Ellis Ross wowed in long-sleeved, sequinned, feathered Chanel, Tessa Thompson wore a rainbow Rosie Assoulin show-stopper and Millie Bobby Brown looked delightful in a strapless cream gown.


    Stars like Matt Walsh and Padma Lakshmi also sported blue ribbons in solidarity with the American Civil Liberties Union. The ribbons have become a mainstay at big events as a form of resistance against President Donald Trump’s policies.


    And Sean Spicer, who joked that Melissa McCarthy should share the Emmy she already won in part for her impersonation of the former White House Press Secretary, even made a surprise appearance.


    Check out all the best looks from the 2017 Emmy Awards below.



     


    This article originally appeared on the US edition of HuffPost.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    You know you’re in 2017, living that ‘woke’ life, when you realise there’s a fake news Halloween costume. 


    Yandy.com, a US-based underwear brand that also specialises in fantasy lingerie, is getting real with their customers and reminding them of what kind of world they live in. 


    Seriously, Dracula’s got nothing on these terrifying headlines.




    The ridiculous costume has even gained the attention of actor Zach Braff, who took to Twitter to lament the existence of such a thing. 






    Needless to say, the garment isn’t exactly to everyone’s taste. 






     


    Side bar, we love the sweep of the neckline on the back. Just saying. 



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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    A peaceful group of activists has been putting hand-written notes in the pockets of garments on the high-street in the name of ethical fashion


    The self-titled ‘craftivists’ are advocates of the ‘who made my clothes campaign’ started by Fashion Revolution.


    They volunteer their own time to write out three carefully crafted messages that encourage shoppers to think about the traceability of their clothes. 



    Talking to HuffPost UK, Craftivist Sarah Corbett said: “I love fashion but I don’t love how many processes harm people and our planet in the making of many clothes on offer and I think it’s important we are not silent when we see pain and suffering.”



    Corbett continued: “However I don’t believe that screaming, demonising or judging people is helpful. I believe that if we want our world to be more beautiful, kind and just then our activism should be beautiful, kind and just.”




    The craftivists have already garnered many fans on social media, with over 9,000 followers on Instagram and 12,000 on twitter. 


    We know the British Fashion Council is taking steps towards a more sustainable future in fashion by supporting projects like Eco Age’s green carpet challenge.


    So while the commercial world takes baby steps towards a fairer fashion industry, people like the craftivists are also making waves in their own peaceful way.



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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    For brides-to-be the London Fashion Week catwalks can be a major source of wedding dress inspiration. 


    The SS18 catwalks certainly did not disappoint.


    Naturally, we investigated to bring you the best modern and alternatively stunning gowns that could easily double up as wedding dresses

    Modern, Sophisticated: Ralph & Russo


    Ralph and Russo’s striking debut at London Fashion Week gave us a lot to admire - especially when it comes to bridal wear. 


    Their ready-to-wear collection featured sheer fabrics in modern cuts and light shades to compliment any beautiful bride. 






    Flirty, Delicate: Preen


    Preen’s SS18 take is a more daring aesthetic, with light, diaphanous fabrics dominating the collection. 


    Some brides may opt to wear an underdress, others may not. Either way, they’re set to exude charm with these Preen creations.







    Ethereal, Decadent: Simone Rocha 


    The SS18 collection from Simone Rocha gave us major Miss Havisham vibes - in a good way.


    The Victoriana trend may be ‘so three seasons ago,’ but these bridal-esque pieces demonstrate that Victorian loveliness is here to stay. 






    Playful, Care-free: Molly Goddard


    For those who want to disrupt the status quo of the long-standing wedding dress staple of a pretty-lace-princess-dress, Molly Goddard’s SS18 collection would make a great companion. 






    Glamorous, Fun: Temperley London


    Temperley London’s latest offering was a masterclass in transportive creativity, so we think a bit of her SS18 collection’s magic would be good for a modern fun-loving bride. 






    Effortless, Modern: DAKS London


    DAKS London nailed their SS18 collection with layers, frills, subtle prints and a clear inclination towards a naturally beautiful, effortless aesthetic. 


    What more could say ‘blushing bride’ than this? 






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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    K-pop (Korean Pop) megastars Mino and Hoony, from the hugely successful band ‘Winner,’ have caused more of a sensation with their FROW appearance than any other celeb this London Fashion Week.


    They fought off stiff competition from the likes of Lily James, Steve McQueen and Felicity Jones, who were spotted among other celebrity attendees at Burberry’s SS18 showcase, to be the most talked about stars on social media. 



    Mino was captured at Incheon International airport wearing a Burberry car coat, cap and tote from the spring/summer collection. 






    Fans absolutely loved the get-up (although we suspect it was probably the love of the wearer that did it for them). 


    Naturally, they shared their appreciation: 






    And when the pair arrived on the scene - well, it wasn’t too dissimilar to the Beatles’ arrival in the US circa 1964.






    In this age of international angst and conflict, what could be more unifying than an all-consuming love of K-pop? 


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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Word on the street is London Fashion Week trends might not have the influence some may want you to believe.


    We caught up with LFW attendees to get their honest opinions on the latest trends and they were very honest.


    Take a look at their candid responses.  


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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    If you take just one style lesson away from London Fashion Week, let it be this: wear your identity with pride.


    The Ashish runway on Monday 18 September proved that fashion can be fun without being frivolous - it can play an important part in fighting hate.


    At a time when incidences of LGB hate crime are soaring, designer Ashish Gupta sent a model down the runway in a sequinned t-shirt proudly emblazoned with the word queer.


    “There’s something very powerful about something as simple as a T-shirt with a slogan on it,” he told HuffPost UK.




    Gupta strongly believes in the power of language, and it angers him the way it is sometimes used thoughtlessly, or at worst callously.


    “I think we’ve stopped thinking about the words we use for certain things,” he explained.


    “I find it quite offensive the way the word ‘immigrant’ is used. White people are called expats when they live in other countries, but people who aren’t white are called immigrants when they live in other countries, and I really don’t understand why.”


    Gupta is an immigrant himself. Born in Delhi, he studied Fine Art in India, and then moved to London to complete an MA at Central St Martin’s in London, and he has run a fashion company here for the past 15 years. 



    Usually designers go brighter for summer collections but this show was a much darker affair than Ashish’s rainbow-filled autumn/winter offering at the last London Fashion Week in February (which can be seen in the video at the top of this article).



    Back then Ashish was still reeling from the shock of the Brexit vote, which he told HuffPost UK made him feel “angry, confused and sad”.


    “I’ve considered this to be my home for the last 20-odd years,” he said. “And for the first time I questioned where I stood with that.


    “It felt suddenly like maybe I wasn’t so welcomed here, by almost half of the people that live in this country.” 



    “I spent several weeks feeling so awful and so miserable and the only way I could lift myself up from that was actually to try to be positive,” Gupta continued.


    “I felt that what worked for me was to fight it with something positive and joyful.


    “Anger can just burn you out, but I think it’s much more healing to be positive.”



    So with the bold rainbow brights replaced by darker tones are we to believe that Gupta’s positivity has now turned to gloom?


    Not one bit.


    In the words of Martin Luther King, Jr, which were left on every seat in the audience:


    “Only in the darkness can you see the stars.”


    Indeed, every inch of dark material glistened with promise.



    Ashish’s designs serve to remind us that even in the darkest of times there is always a (fabulously sparkling) glimmer of hope - as long as you can be proud of who you are.








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    Winnie Harlow walked for Julien Macdonald’s SS18 collection at London Fashion Week and she looked like she was made for his opulent dresses. 



    The 23-year-old first rose to fame as an ex-contestant on America’s Next Top Model (cycle 21), after which she used her platform to pursue modelling. 


    Within minutes of the Julien Macdonald finale, the show was shared online - partly due to Harlow nailing her turn in the coveted designs.





    Harlow was photographed backstage getting ready before the show looking composed and ready to rock the runway.



    Queenie Winnie slayed in the black mesh cut-out dress. All eyes (and smartphones) were on her. 



    This look gave us subtle super (s)hero vibes.


    Harlow and Macdonald were a match made in fashion heaven. 



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    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post UK, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.